Cat (13)

Profile:
Canadian pop rock group from Toronto.
Aliases:
Members:
Variations:
Viewing All | Cat (13)
[a1588417]

Artist

Albums

INTS 1120 Cat (13) - Cat album art Cat (13) Cat (Album) RCA Victor INTS 1120 Germany 1970 Sell This Version

Singles & EPs

77080 Cat (13) - Doing The Best We Can album art The Cat* Doing The Best We Can(7") Apex (3) 77080 Canada 1968 Sell This Version
74-0279 Cat (13) - Light Of Love / Looking Through A Glass Darkly album art Cat (13) Light Of Love / Looking Through A Glass Darkly (Single) Nimbus (5) 74-0279 US 1969 Sell This Version
74-0384 Cat (13) - Funky Sunflower / Take My Life album art Cat (13) Funky Sunflower / Take My Life (Single) RCA 74-0384 US 1970 Sell This Version
74-0331 Cat (13) - Solo Flight album art Cat (13) Solo Flight (Single) Nimbus (5) 74-0331 Canada 1970 Sell This Version
76-3333 Cat (13) - Funky Sunflower / Take My Life album art Cat (13) Funky Sunflower / Take My Life(7", Promo) RCA 76-3333 Mexico 1970 Sell This Version
NNS-9013 Cat (13) - Honey In The Sky album art Cat (13) Honey In The Sky(7", Single) Nimbus (5) NNS-9013 Canada 1971 Sell This Version
RCA ?– 76-3333 Cat (13) Funky Sunflower / Take My Life(7", Promo) RCA RCA ?– 76-3333 Mexico Unknown Sell This Version

Reviews

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smile-lab

smile-lab

April 11, 2016
Originally known as The Spasstiks (circa 1964)
on the high school circuit, this Toronto outfit changed their name to
The Cat (after a Jimmy Smith album of the same name) in 1966
and became a club fixture on the US east coast.
“Love’s Got A Hold On Me” and “Doin’ The Best We Can” were
two early singles released on Apex Records and helped them
land impressive opening slots for the likes of The Guess Who,
Lighthouse, Neil Diamond and Janis Joplin.
The group was soon discovered by Jack Richardson and were signed
to a development deal with Richardson’s Nimbus 9 Productions
which, in turn, led to a record deal with RCA in New York.
The first single, “Light Of Love”, failed to make any noise,
but the next “We’re All In This Together” featuring Richardson’s
fledgling engineer, Bob Ezrin on keyboards, helped the band land
some chart action. A Festival Express train that took entertainers across
Canada from town to town took Cat on tour in 1970 which followed
hot on the heels of the single and self-titled debut album.
Soon creative differences would eat away at the members and
they recorded briefly as Fast Eddie before finally calling it quits in 1972.

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